Concept of facts and theories

Ontological Issues What sorts of things are these candidates? In particular, should the bearers of truth-values be regarded as being linguistic items and, as a consequence, items within specific languagesor are they non-linguistic items, or are they both? In addition, should they be regarded as being concrete entities, i. Sentences are linguistic items:

Concept of facts and theories

The social effects of this period were considerable. They took mainly the form of the displacement of classes. As already noted, there was a general disturbance in Bengal caused by the permanent settlement, whereby the lesser landholders were reduced to the condition of… History and usage of the term The term class first came into wide use in the early 19th century, replacing such terms as rank and order as descriptions of the major hierarchical groupings in society.

This usage reflected changes in the structure of western European societies after the industrial and political revolutions of the late 18th century.

Feudal distinctions of rank were declining in importance, and the new social groups that were developing—the commercial and industrial capitalists and the urban working class in the new factories—were defined mainly in economic terms, either by the ownership of capital or, conversely, by dependence on wages.

Concept of facts and theories

Although the term class has been applied to social groups in a wide range of societies, including ancient city-statesearly empiresand caste or feudal societies, it is most usefully confined to the social divisions in modern societies, particularly industrialized ones. Social classes must be distinguished from status groups; the former are based primarily upon economic interests, while the latter are constituted by evaluations of the honour or prestige of an occupation, cultural position, or family descent.

Early theories of class Theories of social class were fully elaborated only in the 19th century Concept of facts and theories the modern social sciencesespecially sociologydeveloped.

The relations between the classes are antagonistic because they are in conflict over the appropriation of what is produced, and in certain periods, when the mode of production itself is changing as a result of developments in technology and in the utilization of labour, such conflicts become extreme and a new class challenges the dominance of the existing rulers of society.

The dominant class, according to Marx, controls not only material production but also the production of ideas; it thus establishes a particular cultural style and a dominant political doctrine, and its control over society is consolidated in a particular type of political system.

Rising classes that gain strength and influence as a result of changes in the mode of production generate political doctrines and movements in opposition to the ruling class.

Contemporary theories of class Subsequent theories of class have been chiefly concerned with revising, refuting, or providing an alternative to Marxism.

Early in the 20th century, German sociologist Max Weber questioned the importance of social classes in the political development of modern societies, pointing out that religious mores, nationalismand other factors played significant roles. Weber proposed limiting the concept of class to impersonal income distinctions between groups, thereby distinguishing class from social statuscollectivities, or political hierarchies.

But the Marxian emphasis on the importance of class conflict—i. Many opponents of Marxist theory have focused attention on the functional interdependence of different classes and their harmonious collaboration with each other. And indeed, by the midth century, it seemed undeniable that the classes in capitalist societies had tended to lose some of their distinctive character, and the antagonism between them had declined to such an extent that in most economically advanced countries it no longer produced serious political conflict.

That trend seemed to have been arrested by the early 21st century, however, as growing inequality of wealth and income became a major political issue in some advanced countries, particularly the United States.

Sociologists generally posit three classes: The upper class in modern capitalist societies is often distinguished by the possession of largely inherited wealth. The ownership of large amounts of property and the income derived from it confer many advantages upon the members of the upper class.

They are able to develop a distinctive style of life based on extensive cultural pursuits and leisure activities, to exert a considerable influence on economic policy and political decisions, and to procure for their children a superior education and economic opportunities that help to perpetuate family wealth.

Historically, the principal contrast with the upper class in industrial societies was provided by the working class, which traditionally consisted of manual workers in the extractive and manufacturing industries.

There are considerable differences within the working class, however, and a useful distinction exists between skilled, semiskilled, and unskilled workers that broadly corresponds to differences in income level.

What characterizes the working class as a whole is a lack of property and dependence on wages. Associated with this condition are relatively low living standardsrestricted access to higher educationand exclusion, to a large extent, from the spheres of important decision making.

Aside from the dramatic rise in living standards that occurred in the decades after World War IIthe main factor affecting the working class since the midth century was a general shift in the economy from manufacturing to service industries, which reduced the number of manual workers.

In the United States and Britainamong other countries, the decline in traditional manufacturing industries left a core of chronically unemployed persons isolated from the economic mainstream in decaying urban areas.

History and usage of the term

This new urban substratum of permanently jobless and underemployed workers has been termed the underclass by some sociologists.

The middle class may be said to include the middle and upper levels of clerical workers, those engaged in technical and professional occupations, supervisors and managers, and such self-employed workers as small-scale shopkeepers, businesspersons, and farmers. At the top—wealthy professionals or managers in large corporations—the middle class merges into the upper class, while at the bottom—routine and poorly paid jobs in sales, distribution, and transport—it merges into the working class.

Learn More in these related Britannica articles:What is the difference between fact and concept? Update Cancel. Answer Wiki. 4 Answers. Jagdishsinh Jadeja, This is fact; Concept: A concept is a derived, abstracted form of knowledge.

What is the difference between facts and theories? Which does not undermine importance of the scientific pursuit of framing theories just to say that there is a difference between fact and theory.

Theories are (and should be) in constant pursuit of facts. See also Moral breakdown. A moral panic is a feeling of fear spread among a large number of people that some evil threatens the well-being of society.

Concept of facts and theories

A Dictionary of Sociology defines a moral panic as "the process of arousing social concern over an issue – usually the work of moral entrepreneurs and the mass media".. The media are key players in the dissemination of moral indignation, even.

Nov 06,  · Tweet with a location. You can add location information to your Tweets, such as your city or precise location, from the web and via third-party applications. The concept of information as we use it in everyday English in the sense knowledge communicated plays a central role in today's society.

The concept became particularly predominant since end of World War II with the widespread use of computer networks. Truth. Philosophers are interested in a constellation of issues involving the concept of truth. A preliminary issue, although somewhat subsidiary, is to decide what sorts of things can be true.

Moral panic - Wikipedia